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#2320 - 01/31/02 02:46 PM What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL?
Oldguy Offline
I have a lot of time on my hands


Registered: 12/01/01
Posts: 319
There is no ‘best way’ to prepare for law school the summer before you begin 1L. 1L, while not as bad as it is made out to be by the people who produce and sell prep materials, is still a fairly challenging ordeal. I spent my summer before doing what appears to have been average prep work. I found out what courses I was taking that fall, and read the corresponding nutshells casually over the summer. Although I didn’t pick up too much from them, they seemed to help in that when I actually got into class, it helped that I already had a broad oversight of where the course was going. And for my second semester of 1L, I didn’t read the nutshells before, and although the material was not made any more difficult, I could notice that I didn’t manage to get a picture of where the professor was going with the subject until the middle of the semester. But there are other good prep books out there too. The ‘Examples and Explanations’ series (by Aspen publishing, I think) would in retrospect have been a better read over the summer because they are damn good reference books throughout the rest of the semester for when you don’t understand things.

Other people claimed to have read nothing the summer before. I’m not sure whether they are telling the truth or not, because most people are spending so much cash on law school that they can’t afford to not go in to 1L firing on all cylinders. But there is something to be said about simply not doing anything too intellectual before law school. Of course, if you get bored, then I would recommend reading a law book or two. But you won’t get another break for a while, and you really need the rest.

If you’re confident in your intellectual abilities, then law school is nothing too difficult. I’d recommend taking it easy the summer before 1L, and reading a book or two. But if you’re not so sure that you can handle the heavy workload so easily, then perhaps put a little more effort into your prep work, but don’t overdo it.

As far as law school prep courses go, stay away from them. You might benefit a little, but they are so expensive that the cost outweighs the benefits. Certainly, if you are planning on working during 1L, then forget the $2000 prep course and save the cash so you don’t have to work so hard during the semester. I didn’t take any courses and I ended up doing just fine.

If you don’t want to do intellectual prep work, then try some technical prep work. You might want to read a book on how to brief. Or ask a current law student to sit down with you for half an hour and show you. And read a couple of easy cases and brief them, just so you know roughly the format of the cases you will be reading. And finally, if you are planning on taking a laptop to school, learn to type. You will save yourself hours and hours a week if you can type fast.

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#2321 - 02/01/02 02:53 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: Oldguy]
Jellybean Offline
Member


Registered: 12/05/01
Posts: 24
I'm one of those who didn't read anything about law or law school before starting. I didn't know anyone who had gone to law school and had no idea what to expect. I didn't realize that other people prepared over the summer, nor would I have known where to start had I wanted to prepare. Fortunately, I did very well gradewise, despite my lack of preparation -- so I suppose reading before starting law school certainly isn't necessary to do well.

I've seen two schools of thought on preparing before your first year. The first is that it is very helpful to get a basic understanding of first-year subjects because it will help you be less overwhelmed when you actually start school. The other opinion seems to be that since you'll be doing hours and hours of legal reading once you start school, enjoy your freedom while you can and read only for pleasure.

I think had I known, I would have done some preparation over the summer. As Oldguy mentioned earlier, I agree that the Aspen E&E series are probably the easiest to understand for someone with no legal background. I bought them after classes started and found them useful during the semester as well; they helped clarify things I may not have caught on my own. I also used them while studying for exams. The questions in the books are very similar to exam quesions and reading the model answers gave me a good idea of what kinds of things professors are looking for.

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#88361 - 10/28/09 09:58 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: Oldguy]
Sartoris Offline
Senior Member


Registered: 10/28/09
Posts: 25
Loc: Philadelphia
Hey there I don't know if anyone be paying attention to this thread but I'm a 39 yo who just sent out all my apps and while I'm waiting, I want to do what I can to prepare for law school assuming I'll get in somewhere. When you say you read the "nutshells" what exactly are the "nutshells" ? It sound like I need to pick up these E&E books
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#88362 - 10/28/09 10:24 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: Sartoris]
Edintally Offline
Senior Contributor


Registered: 07/13/08
Posts: 161
I wouldn't bother buying supplements at least until you get to school. Some Profs. use them, most don't. 2 and 3Ls will have a better handle on what might be helpful at your school with your specific teachers.
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#88363 - 10/28/09 10:32 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: Edintally]
AnnaD Offline
NTL Addict


Registered: 02/19/08
Posts: 607
"Nutshells" are these: http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_0_8?ur...refix=nutshell.

If it makes you feel better to dive into this stuff, the Nutshells and the E&E series are probably pretty accessible (outlines are really hard to get anything out of until you've taken the class). But you really don't need to do anything legal to prepare for law school. If you're out of the habit of reading tough, dense texts, doing so might be useful. And most of the "how to succeed in law school" kinds of books will give you a good idea of the curriculum and so on. But you really don't have to do anything before starting school to be successful.

(There are some who hold otherwise, very strongly. The overwhelming majority of law students I know don't feel it was necessary to do anything the year before starting, but there's a vocal minority who feels differently. Just so you know!)

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#88364 - 10/29/09 12:31 AM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: AnnaD]
oldlawgirl Offline
NTL Addict


Registered: 11/05/06
Posts: 595
I have said it before and will say it again, the best way to prepare for 1L is to get your life organized. Here are a few suggestions:
- Get a good jump on holiday shopping, especially if you have a family/kids. Most law schools have their first set of exams right before the holidays. Having one big thing out of the way, will help you handle the stress and give you more precious free time.
- If you are not computer savvy then become so RIGHT NOW. Research computers if you need to buy one and don't forget to consult your law school's tech department for advice and discounts. I recommend the lightest, smallest laptop possible as you will spend more time with it that your significant other.
- If you are moving, get your housing, banking, and all that other stuff lined up. Don't wait until the last minute to move to the law school city as you want to find your way around and get comfortable.
- If you have an exercise program, consider your schedule and how you will keep it up during school. Or, start an exercise program as it is a great stress reliever.
- take care of your health. Get a medical exam and take care of health issues. If you are a woman, have your annual exam and mammogram done now so you don't have to worry about it during the school year. Find a primary care physician close to the school so you do not have to rely on student health for flu, sinus infections, etc. (I always thought student health services really could not deal with the older student. Every time I went there for something, I would get the standard safe sex lectures and birth control talk even though it should have been obvious THAT ship had sailed. LOL)
- SPend some quality time with your family, take a vacation or some time off with them. Communicate with them about your upcoming schedule and make sure they understand the pressures of law school. (FWIW, ls did not intrude too much on my family life. But, some of my classmates really struggled with juggling family and ls.)
- I was one of those naive idiots that new NOTHING about ls when I first started. I remember sitting in those first few weeks of classes and thinking this may not have been the best way to live out a mid-life crisis. In retrospect, I wish I had learned a little bit about law before I started. One of the things I think would be really valuable is to learn the lingo. Know and understand common legal terms. Buy a cheap, used, paperback Black's Law Dictionary (an old edition is fine, they don't change much). A small pocket version is fine cause you can throw it in your backpack. Also, learn how a case progresses through the court system in your state and also in the federal courts. For instance, in my state (Illinois), cases start in circuit court, then go to the Appellate COurt and then to the State Supreme COurt. Different states call these courts different things. I believe that in NY, the SUpreme COurt is the first level. If you are going to study one subject before law school, make it civil procedure. It will apply across all other subjects and will really help you get a grasp on the actual court procedures. When I would first start reading cases, I would have fits trying to figure out what court we were in and who was who (Appellant/Appellee can be very confusing). Here is my tip, make a list of the courts. EX: Circuit appealed to appellate; reversd and remanded back to circuit then back to appellate, affirmed and appealed to state supreme court and that is the ruling we are reading now. The appellant is JOnes and the Appellee is Smith. If it helps, go through the entire case and substitute in the names of the parties everywhere they refer to APpellant/Appellee. On your list of the court progression, right down the "winner" and "loser" at each level. It will really help you keep it all clear and you will get the hang of it very quickly.

That's all I can think of right now....Hope this helps.

Oh wait - I did remember something else. Most states let you start the application for bar admission in your 1L year and, in fact, encourage it by giving you the option of applying early with a much lower fee. You will need to provide lots of old information including past addresses (for at least 10 years and maybe even back to age 18!!!!); past employers with detail about addresses, phone number, dates, supervisors; all secondary schools with dates, addresses, etc.; arrest records including, in some states, traffic tickets. Start getting this info together so you are not rushing around getting it before the app deadline for a lowered fee. And that deadline is always at an awkward time like when your first brief is due.

And one more thing.....you will want to get a resume together for on campus interviews for summer jobs. You will start applying for those sometime in December, I believe. It will help to at least have a good draft resume written so that you are not scrambling to put one together at the same time you are studying for exams and CHristmas shopping - didn't I tell you to get that done ;-)!

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#88366 - 10/29/09 12:33 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: oldlawgirl]
SJDAVIS Offline
Contributor


Registered: 12/10/07
Posts: 66
....if you have (and need to rely on your car/s) make sure they are fully serviced and in good working order (if only I had thought of this first).....
_________________________
Steve

What you see is what you get, but what you see depends on where you stand.

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#88374 - 10/29/09 03:52 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: Oldguy]
kittydoctor Offline
Beyond hope


Registered: 07/18/06
Posts: 1261
Loc: Northern Colorado
Not having done it yet, my plan is to get into even more excellent physical shape, read a lot for pleasure, get things in order and chill out. I am lucky to have a jump start program not based on grades.

Will study nothing to do with law, although I have Black's, the Blue Book, and two copies of the Constitution.

Explore my new home and get into the community. Work on my Spanish.
_________________________
Mary

The cow is of the bovine ilk,
One end is moo, the other milk.
Ogden Nash


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#88376 - 10/29/09 03:57 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: kittydoctor]
Adaz Offline
Senior Member


Registered: 05/27/08
Posts: 41
Enjoy the time you have now. That is the much I can say!
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#88377 - 10/29/09 04:00 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: SJDAVIS]
Sartoris Offline
Senior Member


Registered: 10/28/09
Posts: 25
Loc: Philadelphia
You guys are so awesome. Especialy oldlawgirl. That gives me a lot to think about. I'm lucky to be supported by my partner, and I only work part-time as an adjunct English prof. So I think I will go ahead and do some reading. If it turns out I'm wasting my time--well I wasn't using all of it right now anyway. I guess I'll pick up the E&E on Civil Procedure, and see how that goes.

The other advice is exceellent. I don't have to worry about the mamogram, but you helped me set a new personal goal-- get in good enough shape that my doc will take me off my blood pressure meds. by August. I don't want to be the only guy in the lecture hall whose fluid pill interferes with concentration. Some of these health/aging issues are starting seem very real to me. In my LSAT prep class I had to show up early every night to make sure I could get the spot right under a lighting fixture because 21yo eyes are clearly different from 39 yo old eyes. I guess we find ways of adapting.

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#88411 - 11/02/09 09:13 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: Sartoris]
backbencher Offline
NTL Addict


Registered: 10/07/06
Posts: 889
Loc: Florida
Here's my 2 cents (again):

*Relax, enjoy, read, eat out, take trips, etc. You won't be able to do these for a while.

*Do all put off projects, assignments, and chores. If you don't replace that door knob or put up those shelves now, it ain't happening until after you sit the bar exam. \:o

*The E&E and Nutshell (and I would add, Understanding) advice is well-intentioned, but recent events have put it in another light. Teaching non-lawyers I learned rapidly that these do not help when taken out of context, and we now aggresively recommend against them for MBA students and what not. These resources can either reinforce or explain (the more opaque concepts) what you learn after attending the lecture and reading (or attempting to read) the main course text. But without some firm foundation these are generally too light to give you any real understanding or knowledge on theirn own. I remember trying to read the required supplements for Property the weeks before I started (because they looked easier and shorter to me.) They meant nothing and, since we had no assigned readings in them, I put them aside until just before exams (a little too late.) And, WOW, what a difference. They not only made sense now, they made a lot of the less clear material make more sense. The next semester I did not start so late and grades took off. Point: supplements are just that. Used in conjunction with the course and other materials, they help a lot. But I am not sure a few weeks with a nutshell before Civ Pro is going to help all that much. \:\(

*Point 2 on supplements. Everyone here who has been through 1L already usually has a strong opinion on using supplements and, if pro, which series is "best." For me it would be the LEXIS Understanding series (and I have a friend who is now a new Law Prof themselves who also swears by them), but I know those who swear by E&E, Nutshell, etc. So here are two pieces of advice for picking these:
-If your professor wrote or recommends a supplement, use that one. The end! (It's like a hint that this is the approach they are looking for.) ;\)
-If you can, try all the major brands (many are available, often on reserve, in your library) and find the one that makes the best sense to you. Law school supplements are a little like golf clubs: If one brand was right for everyone, all the others would be out of business by now. (There is also an obvious Goldilocks anaology here. One should be "just right.") \:\)

But seriously, when you look at it in retrospect, it's not like being a few chapters up in any given course made a lot of difference to all the ones I didn't read ahead. At the end of 1L people who didn't buy any books until orientation week will be getting law review nominations while some who really prepped will be hoping their grades are just enough to stay enrolled. Trust me: You will value the time spent with family, friends, and hobbies before law school a hell of a lot more than you will any value you may get from "starting early." Law school is about to take over your life for the next 3-4 years. Why give it anymore than it is already taking?
_________________________
"Audere est Facere" (To Dare is To Do)

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#88415 - 11/02/09 10:07 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: backbencher]
Sartoris Offline
Senior Member


Registered: 10/28/09
Posts: 25
Loc: Philadelphia
Wow this is discussion bord is really different from some advice I'm reading out elsewhere. Thanks for the thoughtful response. There are those who maintain that lectures in law school are little help in grasping material that will be tested on exams. Implicit in your comments Backbencher, is a different view-- that you can't understand so well until AFTER the lectures (so they must be worth something eh?)

Obviously I'm on the wrong side of Law school to know, but I have a Ph.D. in English, getting was a sometimes embittering experience so when I hear cynical advice about law school--well it isn't impossible to believe that one might be left to one's own devices. But OK I'll continue to try to weigh these different views somehow, but actually I do have the time right now. So . . . how much can I lose.

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#88417 - 11/02/09 11:02 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: Sartoris]
backbencher Offline
NTL Addict


Registered: 10/07/06
Posts: 889
Loc: Florida
 Quote:
Implicit in your comments Backbencher, is a different view-- that you can't understand so well until AFTER the lectures (so they must be worth something eh?)


Well, I would not go too far. Some are fairly worthless. But even those have a tendency, once you realize you are going to be tested on this stuff, to sharpen your focus and make the concepts a little less abstract. A lot (most?) of what you learn first-year is not very applicable to real lawyering. So when you are first exposed to some of these really abstract concepts, like future interests, class at least makes them relevent to passing the class! The first few weeks of lecture (when everyone is still paying attention) at least help you develop the necessary mindset (deeply warped) to start understanding this stuff.

For what it's worth, I am a fellow Ph.D., and mine was law-related. You still wind up having to learn a completely new way to think before you can even begin to start grasping this stuff. And if it achieves nothing else, class and practice tests will help you adopt the proper mindset. You may still end up teaching yourself more than your professors do, but first, as the late great Strother Martin once said, "You gotta get your mind right!"

(P.S.: Welcome to the forum. I am notorious for these "name that movie" quotes.)
_________________________
"Audere est Facere" (To Dare is To Do)

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#88421 - 11/03/09 02:05 AM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: backbencher]
Miche Offline
Senior Member


Registered: 10/30/09
Posts: 30
Loc: SoCal
For supplements: I liked the Emanuel line. And I'll admit that I liked reading them even when I wasn't taking a particular class. I think if read for flavor rather than content, outlines can be useful even before law school.

For law school life: Has anyone mentioned getting to know your colleagues? That saved me. I met other 1Ls online during the application proces and in the summer. We chatted for months. Jokes, advice, fears. When August rolled around, I already had a support group. Which helped, because my 1L year was a tumultuous ride, for reasons entirely unrelated to law school. It was great to have ready-made friends.

For non-law school life, I second (third, fourth!) all the advice about getting your affairs into order. And I'd add that sometimes "affairs in order" extend beyond the practical and the family-related. Sometimes, it's whimsical stuff like bungee jumping, buying a nice bath robe, watching the Back To The Future trilogy. Finding ways to stay happy puts things in perspective. Yeah, law school is huge and life-changing. But you had a life before law school, and parts of it made you happy, and it's good to remind yourself of that. It gives you practice in maintaining perspective after law school starts.
_________________________
Into everyone's life, a little law must fall.
-Miche, co-creator of Sharp & Useless

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#88431 - 11/03/09 06:38 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: Miche]
Sartoris Offline
Senior Member


Registered: 10/28/09
Posts: 25
Loc: Philadelphia
I see, Backbencher, all that makes sense. Yes I will make a point of getting my affairs in order. My health being the biggest thing-- I don't think I'm old yet, but I'm not as young as I was when I went to grad school the first time.
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#88432 - 11/03/09 06:38 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school [Re: Sartoris]
Sartoris Offline
Senior Member


Registered: 10/28/09
Posts: 25
Loc: Philadelphia
Oh and thanks miche and others for helpful thought and comments.
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#92020 - 11/30/10 03:32 AM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: Oldguy]
JacobAdam Offline
Junior Member


Registered: 11/30/10
Posts: 5
There is no single path that will preparing summer season. In summer you should realize your writing knowledge. You could develop a high degree of skill at written communication. Language is the most important tool of a lawyer, and lawyers must learn to express themselves clearly and concisely. You have to spend more time for writing, it will helps with good training in writing. Fundamental writing skills, however, must be acquired and refined before you enter law school. One of the best ways for papering your summer vacation, you have to seek experienced professional writers. They provide enhanced coaching and support your writing. So you could easily buy research papers from expert professionals about your assignment.
_________________________
I am JacibAdam. I have 6 years experience on writing. Now am working at research paper writing service company. I have dedicated all my time for writing.

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#92026 - 11/30/10 10:40 AM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: JacobAdam]
AnnaD Offline
NTL Addict


Registered: 02/19/08
Posts: 607
Dude, are you REALLY suggesting on a board of law students that we BUY papers?? I find that incredibly offensive, and really don't think you should be here hawking your buy-a-paper scam.
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#92028 - 11/30/10 01:10 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: AnnaD]
tonyg Offline
I have a lot of time on my hands


Registered: 10/29/07
Posts: 372
Loc: A tropical island in the South...
I second what AnnaD said. Take your wares elsewhere.
_________________________
Class of 2010.5
Never give in, never give in, never; never; never; never - in nothing, great or small, large or petty - never give in. W. Churchill

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#92036 - 12/01/10 04:32 AM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: AnnaD]
ThaneJMessinger Offline
Senior Contributor


Registered: 06/10/09
Posts: 238
 Originally Posted By: AnnaD
Dude, are you REALLY suggesting on a board of law students that we BUY papers?? I find that incredibly offensive, and really don't think you should be here hawking your buy-a-paper scam.



I'll third the motion.

In addition, the writing that's needed for excelling in law school is VERY different from "writing" as most have done before and during law school.

In a law exam, write like an English major and lose points. Write like a first-grade (okay, eighth-grade) lawyer and rack 'em up. [Grade as to writing style; "lawyer" as to actual lawyerly analysis. The two are not the same.]

The writing in the Legal Research and Writing course, for example and as mentioned elsewhere, is nothing like the writing that is needed for a law exam.* Confusing the two will be deadly.

*It's often not terribly like real legal writing either.

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#92076 - 12/06/10 08:46 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: ThaneJMessinger]
backbencher Offline
NTL Addict


Registered: 10/07/06
Posts: 889
Loc: Florida
Oh yeah, I fourth the motion (poor Robert's Rules here!) \:\(

I definitely smell a rat here. This is a great idea. Have papers that read totally different from exam essays and pray no one ever catches on. This is a terrific option for those who really want to experience the Honor Court up close and personal. (To say nothing of the Bar Examiners C&F division.)
_________________________
"Audere est Facere" (To Dare is To Do)

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#92309 - 01/17/11 06:43 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: backbencher]
pkt63 Offline
Member


Registered: 01/08/11
Posts: 12
Thane, is there a way to get examples of Legal Research and Writing writing? I get what you are saying, kind of, but would love to see like an old test an a good response and a bad response to really get it.
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#92319 - 01/18/11 08:25 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: pkt63]
ThaneJMessinger Offline
Senior Contributor


Registered: 06/10/09
Posts: 238
 Originally Posted By: pkt63
Thane, is there a way to get examples of Legal Research and Writing writing? I get what you are saying, kind of, but would love to see like an old test an a good response and a bad response to really get it.



PKT63 -

This is the first chance I've had to be on in a while [cheering?] and I suppose I can too jump in on time. = : )

Okay. How about this by the numbers? (But a few nano-disclosure/rants before getting to LR&W.)

First, I am part of the vocal minority that believes one can and should prepare for law school.

Second, this preparation should include getting one's affairs in order. Quite right.

Third, this preparation can be extensive, but need not be. (And that's not what I recommend.)

Fourth, it's important to separate the core course from the ancillary ones. The core courses are the ONLY courses the profs care about. Those are the six main courses (or some minor variation thereof): Contracts, Con Law, Civ Pro, Property, Torts, Criminal Law. Sure hope I got 'em all. The ancillary course is, yes, Legal Research and Writing.

Fifth . . . Okay. From this, it should be clear that you should NOT spend as much time on a LRW course as you do on a core course. Yet, every semester, students are running around like chickens without their proverbial heads. (If you've ever seen a real chicken getting slaughtered, you'll understand the impact of the phrase relating to chickens and heads getting cut off. It's gruesome, and they really do flop around for an agonizingly long time.)

Sixth, sorry to be so graphic. But this is important. DO NOT SPEND TOO MUCH TIME ON THIS.

Seventh, what you should do is to give your LRW instructur EXACTLY what they want, the way they want it. No, it might not look exactly like it would in a firm. No, it might not be the way you would like to do it. Stop. Give them what they want. Most will give you some hints, if not a sample, as to formatting, etc. Your task is to, essentially, "fill in" the format with mostly prefab analysis and citation.

Eighth, How to get that "prefab" part? By relying on the many legal services. What you'll likely be asked to do is in some gray-ish area of some area of law of interest to someone. Each component of that analysis has been done a thousand times before. Your task is to draw from that preexisting analysis, make sure it's balanced (or persuasive, depending upon the task), is properly cited and four-square legitimate, go see your instructor again, and hand it in and forget about it.

Ninth, this is important. It provides a pretty writing sample of use during interviews. So, it should look pretty. That means it should look EXACTLY like your LRW instructors say it should. Again, if there's any doubt, check with them. Format is not to be resisted (in law school or practice). Fill in the blanks, make it accurate and pretty, and get back to your real work.

Tenth, does this explain why it would be dangerous to offer an example? There is no single example of what a LRW paper should look like, for the precise reason that each instructor evaluates it according to his own standard. (My flight instructor, a woman, insisted that I stick with "him" when referring to an object pronoun...and since I've become an old fart anyway, I'll run the risk of offense for the benefit of two words. Lawyers! = : ) Moreover, if there were a standard, what would happen is that students would practically plagiarize with identical and near identical work, which is not the objective. Just because every argument has been done a thousand times before doesn't mean there's not a better way to do it.

Eleventh . . . beep, we're sorry, you have reached a connection that is no longer in service. To better offer support for our other viewers, we are limiting legal responses to ten points. If you would like to go to the main menu, please press the pound sign. Otherwise, please hang up and try again.

Drats. Foiled again.

= : )

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#92321 - 01/19/11 11:07 AM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: ThaneJMessinger]
Sartoris99 Offline
Senior Contributor


Registered: 01/07/10
Posts: 111
Well I've got only one semester under my belt but I walked the middle path with SOME Prep. I read Examples and Explanations books for Contacts and did quite well in contracts. I also read two Delaney books about exam writing. And a book called Getting to Maybe (which was alright but too abstract fro 0L. It's hard to take their point until after you have an exam behind you, at which time it's too late. I think Delaney is better. It's something like "How to take Law school Exams" I can't remember the exact title. I really like E&Es.
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#92326 - 01/19/11 10:26 PM Re: What is the best way to prepare for law school the summer before you begin OneL? [Re: Sartoris99]
ThaneJMessinger Offline
Senior Contributor


Registered: 06/10/09
Posts: 238
 Originally Posted By: Sartoris99
Well I've got only one semester under my belt but I walked the middle path with SOME Prep. I read Examples and Explanations books for Contacts and did quite well in contracts. I also read two Delaney books about exam writing. And a book called Getting to Maybe (which was alright but too abstract fro 0L. It's hard to take their point until after you have an exam behind you, at which time it's too late. I think Delaney is better. It's something like "How to take Law school Exams" I can't remember the exact title. I really like E&Es.


Delaney's books are excellent. I had coffee with him years ago. He's a great fellow, and has done some great work.

Also, if anyone is still in first-year and has not done so yet, I encourage you to attend LEEWS, or get the audio tapes. This will help in focusing on how to put your thoughts down on paper in a useful (i.e., lawyerlike) way.

[I know, I know. These add to the very real costs of law school. As we all know, however, ours is an expensive profession. Focusing in the right ways will repay itself a thousandfold. Moreover, if you pick up even a handful of usable tips from any source, that time is well worth it.]

As with everything else, however, these resources are valuable to the extent they are used. Your books such as these should be tattered from overuse. It's better to use one source very well than a dozen not at all.

And, as part of the above, take *dozens* of practice exams. I would write take *dozens* of practice exams for each course, but then I would be arrested for inciting revolution. (It's still true, though.) Take these under controlled conditions--no interruptions, etc.--and time yourself short. Just as with the LSAT, you'll notice something funny. Those patterns start re-appearing. Before you know it, you'll realize what profs do: they have only so much they can test on, and they pretty much test on ALL of the major points, for all exams. It's just a matter of weaving the facts into a pre-existing analysis of the various legal points in each subject.

Fun!

(Really. = : )

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